Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q. What are the different sleep quality levels in SAFTE-FAST?

In SAFTE-FAST, sleep quality is used to determine the quality of the environment for where sleep is to occur. There are four options that can be profiled.

Excellent: This setting assumes no interruptions in sleep from environmental disturbances.

Good: This settings averages two, 5 minute interruptions per hour resulting in 50 minutes of restorative sleep per hour or 83% of Excellent.  For aviation, this is the level assumed for a Class 1 rest facility.

Fair: This settings averages four, 5 minute interruptions per hour resulting in 40 minutes of restorative sleep per hour or 67% of Excellent. For aviation, this is the level assumed for a Class 2 rest facility.

Poor: This settings averages six, 5 minute interruptions per hour resulting in 30 minutes of restorative sleep per hour or 50% of Excellent. For aviation, this is the level assumed for a Class 3 rest facility. 

Q. What are recommendations for reducing fatigue risk when building a shift schedule?

  • Fatigue will be worse when working during the night. To reduce risk, try selecting a start time between 0600-1800, shortening the shift duration, or permitting napping on-shift. Napping on shift may help reduce fatigue risk and improve effectiveness for this schedule.

  • If the time off between shifts is not long enough for workers to get enough sleep. Try reducing shift duration, decreasing days on, or increasing days off to reduce risk.

  • Fatigue will accumulate over the course of a schedule. To reduce risk, try shortening the number of times a schedule repeats, shortening the number of days on, or increasing the number of days off between shifts.

  • Adapting to a new schedule requires time. Increase the number of repeats for this schedule to allow workers to develop a routine and allow workers more time off before between changes to a schedule.